2017 BPPA Pictures of the Year

03 Feature

1. Billie Weiss / Boston Red Sox / Freelance

A local boy pops a wheelie on his bicycle in the village of El Mam—n, Dominican Republic Friday, July 21, 2017.
A local boy pops a wheelie on his bicycle in the village of El Mam—n, Dominican Republic Friday, July 21, 2017.

2. Suzanne Kreiter / The Boston Globe

Syrian refugee Abdulkader Hayani set up his new professional-grade sewing machine as his daughter Ameeneh played in the box it arrived in. The machine was purchased with donations from families at the Islamic Center of Boston, Wayland. In Syria, he had a thriving tailoring shop, which was destroyed in the war.Ê A year ago, eight Syrian families fled the violence of their homeland and immigrated to Greater Boston. They were among the last such refugees allowed into the United States as a result of the Trump administrationÕs multiple efforts to ban immigrants from certain majority Muslim countries, including Syria To smooth the transition, Jewish Family Service of Metrowest launched the Syrian Refugee Humanitarian Project, working with Jewish synagogues, Islamic centers, doctors, dentists, businesses, and an army of volunteers to provide safety, hope and a new life to these immigrants.  Out of the twelve families scheduled to arrive, only eight made it to America before the travel ban and Trump administration's lowering of refugee numbers halted the process. The families shared their  sometimes painful, sometimes joyous journey including their struggles to acclimate to the climate, both meteorological and political; their efforts to adapt to a new culture while preserving their heritage; their determination to achieve self-sufficiency; and the bonds of friendship they forged with people who practice a religion they were taught as children to hate.
Syrian refugee Abdulkader Hayani set up his new professional-grade sewing machine as his daughter Ameeneh played in the box it arrived in. The machine was purchased with donations from families at the Islamic Center of Boston, Wayland. In Syria, he had a thriving tailoring shop, which was destroyed in the war.Ê
A year ago, eight Syrian families fled the violence of their homeland and immigrated to Greater Boston. They were among the last such refugees allowed into the United States as a result of the Trump administrationÕs multiple efforts to ban immigrants from certain majority Muslim countries, including Syria To smooth the transition, Jewish Family Service of Metrowest launched the Syrian Refugee Humanitarian Project, working with Jewish synagogues, Islamic centers, doctors, dentists, businesses, and an army of volunteers to provide safety, hope and a new life to these immigrants. Out of the twelve families scheduled to arrive, only eight made it to America before the travel ban and Trump administration’s lowering of refugee numbers halted the process. The families shared their sometimes painful, sometimes joyous journey including their struggles to acclimate to the climate, both meteorological and political; their efforts to adapt to a new culture while preserving their heritage; their determination to achieve self-sufficiency; and the bonds of friendship they forged with people who practice a religion they were taught as children to hate.

3. Angela Rowlings – The Boston Herald

A life guard keeps watch at Revere Beach, Sunday, June 11, 2017.
A life guard keeps watch at Revere Beach, Sunday, June 11, 2017.

HM 1. Faith Ninivaggi / The Boston Herald

( West Hyannis Port, MA  07/07/17) Flash flood  on fourth Ave. Sophia Estee, 13 and Eliana Estee 11 play in the torrential rain.  July 07, 2017
( West Hyannis Port, MA 07/07/17) Flash flood on fourth Ave. Sophia Estee, 13 and Eliana Estee 11 play in the torrential rain. July 07, 2017

HM 2. Brian Snyder / Reuters

Surfers take advantage of wind and waves from a winter snow storm in Gloucester, Massachusetts, U.S. February 13, 2017.
Surfers take advantage of wind and waves from a winter snow storm in Gloucester, Massachusetts, U.S. February 13, 2017.

HM 3. John Tlumacki / The Boston Globe

Dorchester-8/25/17  Malachi Lewis, 10 has gold glitter dabbed to his face before the start of the annual Caribbean Parade that was held on the streets of Dorchester starting on Martin Luther King Bld. and ending at Franklin Park.
Dorchester-8/25/17 Malachi Lewis, 10 has gold glitter dabbed to his face before the start of the annual Caribbean Parade that was held on the streets of Dorchester starting on Martin Luther King Bld. and ending at Franklin Park.